The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Mechanical Engineering (ME)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

ME 311: Introduction to Energy and Energy Systems

3.00 Credits

This is a required, 3-credit course, primarily for Mechanical Engineering juniors. It is the first course for energies, and energy systems and technologies, including electric utility, power, propulsion, HVAC, refrigeration, and cryogenic systems. It is a course in applied thermal sciences, and discusses internal and external combustion heat engine cycles, heat pump cycles, mixtures and psychrometrics, fuels and combustion, and their associated engineering components and subsystems. An overview of form/type of energy, energy consumption, production, and reserves in the USA and the world, and modern direct energy converters are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative analysis of performance of various energy systems and processes, and on the tradeoffs necessary for improved efficiency, operational characteristics, and environmental acceptability.

ME 314: Fundamentals of Mechatronics

3.00 Credits

This is a 3-credit, upper-level course offered to engineering juniors, seniors and graduate students. This course covers the fundamentals of technologies involved to understand, design and optimize mechatronic systems. Topics include: electric circuits and components, semiconductor electronics, digital circuits, operational amplifiers, A/D & D/A converters, sensors and measurement systems, actuators, microcontrollers and interfacing, control system and system response. The course will take a narrative approach, emphasizing the understanding of fundamentals, the importance of building intuition and integration of engineering systems.

ME 342: Junior Design

3.00 Credits

General topics: Standards; engineering economics; manufacturing processes; and intellectual property. Fundamentals of mechanical design: stress analysis; deflection analysis; failure theories; fatigue. Design of machine elements: screws; fasteners; springs; bearing; gears; shafts. Design process and the assignment of an open-ended design problem. An introduction to solid modeling.

ME 344: System Dynamics

3.00 Credits

Major topics: Mathematical modeling of dynamic systems, Laplace transforms. Transient response analysis and frequency response analysis of mechanical, electrical and fluid systems. Computational solutions of responses of dynamic systems in state space. MATLAB used for analysis and design problems.

ME 362: Heat Transfer

3.00 Credits

This is a survey course of basic heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. The approach is to present the fundamental governing equation for each mechanism and discuss the relevant simplifications for practical engineering applications. This course emphasizes the practical aspects of the student's engineering education; hence, the course seeks to develop and refine the student's ability to analyze arbitrary engineering applications.

ME 371: Introduction to Aerospace Engineering

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 373: Fundamentals of Flight

3.00 Credits

This course presents the practical aspects of flight: basic aerodynamic principles; lift and drag calculations for airfoils and wings; airplane performance parameters (thrust, glide ratio, etc.); stability and control. Time permitting, elements of propulsion and space flight will also be introduced.

ME 392: Dynamics Laboratory

2.00 Credits

Computer simulation of dynamic mechanical systems. Experimental methods for measuring the temporal and frequency response of dynamic systems. Statistical theories of measurement (error analysis, sampling, averaging, correlation).

ME 404: Structural Mechanics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 432: Design of Power & Propulsion Systems

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 441: Senior Design

3.00 Credits

Students will learn topics essential for the design of mechanical systems. Topics will include design, materials and manufacturing, lubrication, friction and wear, columns, and pressure vessels. Students will incorporate engineering standards, and use freehand sketching as well as PC based tools including CAD and Matlab. The course will emphasize individual and group projects. Effective communication of complex ideas through formal oral or written form and informal free hand sketching will be emphasized.

ME 442: Senior Project

3.00 Credits

Provides students with optimum design and synthesis techniques of thermal and mechanical systems. Students apply the presented methods to creative design of complex thermal and mechanical systems. Risk, reliability, and economic analyses are introduced and utilized in the design process. Group discussion, teamwork, oral presentation, and oral reports.

ME 447: Modelling and Simulation of Mechanical/Thermal-Fluid Systems

3.00 Credits

A practical course in the application of finite element methods, computational fluid dynamics, and computational heat transfer in solving real, complex mechanical and thermal-fluid systems. Emphasis will be given to the underlying physics of the problems, specifying boundary and initial conditions, specifying materials, and verifying and interpreting results.

ME 457: Applied Rigid Body Dynamics

3.00 Credits

This course consists of a thorough coverage of kinematics and kinetics of particles, rigid bodies, and multibody systems in three dimensions. A Newton-Euler approach is used for developing equations of motion, and computer simulation of mechanical systems is used extensively. Emphasis is placed on engineering applications, including dynamics of marine, ground, and aerospace vehicles, robotics, machine tool dynamics, and biomechanics. Students are assumed to have familiarity with the fundamentals of particle and rigid body dynamics . Prerequisite: ENGR 202

ME 476: Aerodynamics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 487: Thermal Science Lab

2.00 Credits

This course includes the hands-on performance of and the analysis of results for selected experiments to support the lecture courses of thermodynamics (ENGR 211), fluid mechanics (ENGR 331), heat transfer (ME 362), and energy systems (ME 311). Also, students are taught technical writing skills and are required to submit laboratory reports of professional quality.

ME 502: Introduction to Elec. Packaging and MEMS

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 503: Structural Mechanics

3.00 Credits

A fundamental engineering course that introduces elasticity and mechanics analyses of solid structures, whose topics include: 3-D stresses and strains; stress and strain relations; Airy stress function; 2-D elasticity problems; stress concentrations; failure criteria; introduction to plasticity, fracture and fatigue; bending, torsion and combined loading on structural elements; strain energy and energy method; introduction to the finite element method; plates and shells; buckling.

ME 505: Programming & Software Tools in Mechanical Engineering

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 507: Mechanical Systems and Control

3.00 Credits

Mathematical modeling of dynamic systems; basic principles of feedback; the root-locus and frequency-response design methods. MATLAB used for analysis and design problems. Prerequisite: ME 344 or Graduate Student Status.

ME 510: Modern Control Systems

3.00 Credits

Analysis of control systems in state space, control system design via pole placement, design of state estimators, quadratic optimal control systems design. MATLAB used extensively for analysis and design problems.

ME 517: Engineering Optimization Methods

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 524: Hydro and Coastal Energy Technology

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 526: Alternative Energy Engineering

3.00 Credits

This course: (1) reviews the status of primary energy in the United States and the world; (2) discusses energy production, use, storage, transfer, and conversion; (3) introduces and uses the concept of exergy; (4) applies thermodynamic analyses to energy systems, including ones based on renewable energy sources, which among the considered examples could be wind, solar, geothermal, ocean, tidal, biomass, and hydroelectric; and (5) time permitting, the course will include discussions of combined heating and power (CHP) systems and fuel cells.

ME 527: Renewable Energy & Technology

3.00 Credits

It reviews traditional and alternative energy sources and their usage and problems. It introduces various emerging and/or promising renewable energies and associated engineering technologies/systems, including solar thermal/photovoltaic, biomass/biofuels/ Waste-to-Energy, wind power, hydro power, geothermal, ocean thermal/tidal/current energy, hydrogen/fuel cells, and various direct energy converters. It gives a broad, practical view and quantitative analysis of renewable energies for sustainable use.

ME 529: Environmental Protection for Energy Systems

3.00 Credits

This course presents an overview of modern energy production, conversion, and usage, and their various environmental impacts. Problems and engineering solutions to air pollution, ozone depletion, global warming and climate change, indoor air quality, and HAPs resulted from stationary and mobile energy systems will be discussed. Problem-solving techniques based on mass/energy balance, and chemical reactions are taught for quantitative analysis and design. Prereq: ENGR 211 or graduate status

ME 530: Applied Energy Systems

3.00 Credits

A first course in applied energy systems and technologies, which reviews the fundamentals of thermal-fluid sciences and discusses their applications to power, propulsion, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and cryogenic systems. It is a course in applied thermodynamics that considers the important internal and external combustion heat engine cycles, heat pump cycles, and their associated applied components and systems. A comprehensive overview of energy consumption, production, and reserves in the USA and the world is also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative analysis of performance of various applied energy systems and processes, and on the tradeoffs necessary for improved effectiveness and environmental acceptability.

ME 531: Optimal Design of Energy Systems

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 532: Design of Power and Propulsion Systems

3.00 Credits

A practical design-oriented course dealing with propulsion and power-producing components and systems, including internal combustion engines, fossil fuel-fired power plants, nuclear/hydroelectric power plants, gas turbine engines, nozzles and jet propulsion, spacecraft, and direct energy converters. Open-ended design and computer problems are assigned. Prerequisite: ME 311 or ME 530 or Graduate Student Status.

ME 533: Energy Conservation and HVAC

3.00 Credits

A dual level course in applied energy systems and environmental control, which discusses energy and water conservation opportunities as it relates to heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. The course places emphasis on energy and water savings in HVAC systems in residential and commercial buildings. Prerequisite: ME 311

ME 534: Design of HVAC and Refrigeration

3.00 Credits

A course in applied energy systems and environmental control, which discusses the fundamentals of thermal-fluid sciences and their applications to heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration and cryogenic systems. Course places emphasis on design and analysis of HVAC systems and components. Prerequisite: ME 311 or ME 530 or Graduate Student Status.

ME 535: Design and Optimization of Thermal Systems

3.00 Credits

This course deals with the numerical evaluation of the inevitable trade-offs associated with any thermodynamic or heat transfer system. A distinction will be made between workable and optimal systems. Several manual solutions will be required to ensure that the physics of the system and solution techniques are well understood. A primary analytical tool that will be used for system simulation and evaluation will be the engineering equation solver (EES) program. Although no computer language will be required for simulations, prior experience with windows and spreadsheets will be helpful. Optimal system analysis will include, at least, one calculus method and one search method. Applications will include power and refrigeration systems, electronics cooling, etc.

ME 536: Thermal Environmental Engineering

3.00 Credits

Indoor air quality: standards and regulations; major indoor pollutants (sources, health effects, control strategies); air cleaning processes. Thermal comfort. Open-ended design project by students to determine comfort and IAQ requirements in residential and industrial buildings.

ME 537: Air Pollution and Control

3.00 Credits

A practical, comprehensive course for students interested in energy systems and environmental engineering. It discusses the cause, source, and effect of various primary pollutants, such as particulates, SOx, NOx, CO, VOCs, solid waste, and nuclear waste, and secondary pollutants such as photochemical smog, 03-depleting chemicals, acid gases, and greenhouse gases, from stationary and mobile energy systems. Discussions also include the working principle, performance characteristics, and method of analysis of engineering control equipment and processes for the above pollutants. This course emphasizes the design approach to pollution problems from an applied engineering viewpoint. Open-ended design problems will be assingned and a field trip to a local power plant will be arranged.

ME 538: Design of Solar Systems and Wind Power

3.00 Credits

This course covers the design and engineering of renewable energy systems. To establish the user demand, the residential and commercial energy use for heating, AC lighting, as well as washing and cooking, are first reviewed. Low energy European homes are compared to current designs. The process of estimating available wind and solar energy is presented with example calculations. This provides the basis for designing the wind and solar renewable energy collection systems. The trade-off of designing systems with large energy collection or using a more economical system utilizing combination wind, solar and energy storage is presented. In addition to land-based renewable energy systems, the design of offshore wind farms and the installation logistics is covered. The students will complete a renewable design as an individual or team project.

ME 539: Combustion and Incineration

3.00 Credits

This course discusses the fundamentals of combustion science and processes, and its engineering applications to combustion and incineration systems. The topics include combustion thermodynamics and chemical kinetics; characterization of fuels and chemical wastes; premixed and diffusion flames; ignition, extinction, deflagration, and detonation; environmental impacts due to combustion and incineration; modern combustion technologies and devices; incineration technologies and systems; and pollutants removal from combustors and incinerators.

ME 541: Conduction and Radiation

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 543: Heat Exchanger: Design and Analysis

3.00 Credits

Fundamental analysis, thermodynamic evaluation and design/modeling of both single-phase and two-phase heat exchangers. Discussion of various applications, including compact heat exchangers and high heat flux applications. Students will be required to solve open-ended design problems.

ME 544: Intro to Multiphase Systems

3.00 Credits

Introduction to physical systems consisting of more than one phase or component. Classification of multiphase systems, technological applications. Dispersed vs. separated multiphase systems. Size distribution. Particle-fluid interaction. Multiphase system equations. Introduction to numerical modeling. Introduction to complex multiphase systems: suspensions, emulsions, and sprays.

ME 547: Intermediate Thermodynamics

3.00 Credits

Mass, energy and entropy balances; entropy, irreversibility, and availability (exergy); equations of state and general thermodynamic relations; gas mixtures and liquid solutions; phase equilibrium and stability; applications.

ME 548: Intermediate Heat Transfer

3.00 Credits

The course presents the fundamentals as well as applications of heat transfer for graduate students in engineering. It discusses the basic concepts, material properties, governing laws, and solution techniques for conduction, convection, and thermal radiation. Topics include 1-D/multi-D steady conduction, conduction in composites, insulation, heat transfer fins, unsteady conduction; fluid flows and forced convection, free convection, boiling and condensation, engineering correlation, heat exchanges; blackbody and shape factors, radiation properties, radiant exchange between surfaces, radiation shields, solar/space applications; combined modes of heat transfer.

ME 549: Intermediate Fluid Mechanics

3.00 Credits

Introduction, basic definitions, and properties of fluids. Conservation laws for a closed system. Conservation laws for an open system. Fluid kinematics. Inviscid incompressible flow. Viscous incompressible flow. Introduction to compressible flow.

ME 550: Combustion and Waste Management

3.00 Credits

Dual-level course in energy systems and environmental engineering. Discusses fundamental sciences and practical applications of combustion of fossil fuels, and incineration and management of wastes. Applied combustion and incineration systems, such as car and jet engines, boilers and furnaces/kilns, incinerators, waste-to-energy plants, and land-fill waste management facility will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Graduate students or ME upper classmen).

ME 551: Infrared Systems

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 552: Introduction to Flight Dynamics

3.00 Credits

Aspects of fluid flow - boundary layers, laminar and turbulent flow; subsonic and supersonic flow - shock waves and Mach Number; Bernoulli's equation and dynamic pressure; air resistance - form drag and skin friction; aerodynamic lift and airfoils - stagnation point, pressure coefficient, center of pressure and pitching moments; wing characteristics - downwash and induced drag; introduction t propulsion. Prerequisite: ENGR 331 or equivalent.

ME 554: Aerospace Design

3.00 Credits

In this course, students work on projects related to topics in aerospace engineering. Prereq: minimum GPA of 3.0, or permission by instructor.

ME 557: Advanced Dynamics

3.00 Credits

Multiple methods for obtaining equations of motion for rigid multibody systems. Topics to be covered will include the differentiation of vectors, kinematics, mass distribution, energy functions, and formulation of the equations of motion.

ME 558: Introduction to Ocean Engineering

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 559: Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics

3.00 Credits

Scientific interest in the underwater ambient acoustic environment began during the Second World War II. Initially, military interest led research but later a wide variety of civilian and commercial research began. This class will begin with an overview of general acoustics. The reminder of the course will focus on the particular features of the ocean environment that effect sound propagation as well as applications including sonar. The class is mathematical based but the goal of establishing this foundation is to support a physical understanding of the subject.

ME 560: Introduction to Acoustics

3.00 Credits

The goals of this course include exposing students to mathematical foundations of acoustics. Topics include a brief introduction to one degree of freedom vibrations followed by an in-depth examination of the acoustic wave equation. This knowledge will then provide a foundation for the semester's remaining topics, which include: acoustic metrology, sound propagation, Matlab signal processing, reflection, and transmission.

ME 561: Acoustics & Wave Propagation

3.00 Credits

Vibrating systems; simple, damped, and driven oscillators; strings; bars; membranes and plates. Plane, cylindrical, and spherical waves in a fluid: transmission, refraction, reflection, and absorption. Radiation from point, line, and piston sources.

ME 563: Acoustics Media & Design

3.00 Credits

This applied course covers design and measurement related issues in acoustics. Topics include the acoustics of natural and artificial porous media like gravel, mineral wool, foams and grass. The course addresses the use and design of data acquisition systems, the design of sound absorbers materials as well as the design of apparatuses for measuring acoustic properties. Experimental topics includes, impedance tube measurements, room acoustic measurements and design topics includes, design of sound absorber materials, design of acoustic measurement apparatus: porosity, flow resistivity and tortuosity apparatus. Prerequisite: ENGR 222 or equivalent.

ME 565: Atmospheric Acoustics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 566: Advanced Vibrations and Structural Dynamics I

3.00 Credits

Free and forced vibrations of single degree of freedom systems under a variety of time dependent loads. Damping in structures. Unit impulse response functions. Frequency domain analysis. Free and forced vibrations of multi degree of freedom systems. Modal Analysis, eigenvalues, eigenvectors. Numerical integration, time history analysis, and modal analysis of MDOF systems. Introduction to vibration of continuous systems.

ME 568: Experimental Vibration and Acoustics

3.00 Credits

Properties of acoustic and vibration sensors and actuators, collection of large data sets using robotically positioned transducers, automated data acquisition and signal processing. Post-processing techniques including statistical analysis, reduction of multi-dimensional data sets, and image generation. Comparison of experimental results with theoretical predictions of acoustic and vibration behavior. Prerequisite: ME 392 or graduate status.

ME 572: Computer Controlled Mechanical Systems

3.00 Credits

Introduction to computer control. Analysis and design of multi-input multi-output digital controllers in the z-domain. Stability, controllability, and observability analysis. Parameter identification. Design and testing of various computer control systems. Prerequisite: ME 507.

ME 573: Marine Bioacoustics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 574: Orbital Mechanics and Mission Design

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 576: Aerodynamics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 577: Applied Mechatronics

3.00 Credits

This course covers the fundamentals of technologies involved in mechatronics (intelligent electro-mechanical systems), and techniques to apply these technologies to mechatronic system design. Topics include: electronics (A/D, D/A converters, op-amps, filters, power devices); software program design, event-driven programming; hardware and DC stepper motors, solenoids, and robust sensing. The course will take a narrative approach, emphasizing the importance of building intuition and understanding, with focus on the integration, system design and engineering.

ME 578: Ocean Acoustics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 579: Acoustic Metamaterials

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 580: Introduction to MEMS and Microfabricatiion

3.00 Credits

This course presents an introduction to the principles, materials, microfabrication techniques, applications and design issues/constraints to realize modern MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Students will gain an understanding of microfabrication techniques for MEMS including photolithography, surface and bulk micromachining, LIGA, and other processes. Transduction mechanisms for sensors and actuators (coupling thermal, mechanical and electrical domains) and micro-scale engineering design issues will also be discussed. The course will include laboratory demonstrations with the newly established microfabrication-outside-clean-room facility. Students will do class projects to demonstrate the mastery of basic concepts in design and fabrication process of a MEMS device. Prerequisite: Senior status and graduates.

ME 581: Introduction to Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip Technologies

3.00 Credits

This course presents fundamentals and applications of microfluidic technologies for lab-on-a-chip applications. The course provides a broad view of the field of microfluidics and knowledge of relevant fabrication methods and analysis techniques. Microfluidic fabrication techniques, transport processes, flow control methods, molecular separations and detection techniques will be emphasized. Students will do class projects and are expected to demonstrate mastery of basic concepts in microfluidic modeling, design, and fabrication of a microfluidic system selected in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: ENGR 331

ME 582: Introduction to Mechanical Fundamentals of Electronic Systems

3.00 Credits

An introduction to mechanical fundamentals required for designing reliable electronic systems. The focus will be on the fundamental principles of semiconductor devices, circuit theory and electrical design considerations, electronic packaging technologies, effect of materials compatibility, manufacturing processes, thermal stress, mechanical stress, environmental effects on product performance, failure analysis, reliability prediction, durability and cost.

ME 583: Mechanical Design and Optimization of Electronic Systems

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 584: Introduction to Nanotechnology

3.00 Credits

As nanotechnology becomes increasingly important in the 21st century, there will be increasing demand for graduates with strong interdisciplinary education in this area. With this in mind, the objective of this course is to introduce nanotechnology and its applications. Focus will be on defining nanotechnology, presenting a history of nanotechnology development and projecting its potential impact on the 21st century, nano-materials, nano-fabrication and nano-engineering, nano-mechanics, applications of nanotechnology, challenges in research and development of nanotechnologies, and the role of mechanical engineers in the exciting field of nanotechnology.

ME 585: Machine Vision & Imaging Tech. in M.E.

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 586: Experimental Mechanics and Applications

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 588: Robotics & Mechatronics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 589: Smart Structures

3.00 Credits

Mechanics of smart materials and current approaches for engineering smart structures to monitor health, self-sensing and self-healing. Smart structures. Constitutive models for smart materials. Piezoresistive materials, piezoelectric ceramics, electro-active polymers, shape memory alloys, bio-inspired materials and self-healing materials. Sensors and sensor networks. Structural health monitoring. Prerequisites: ENGR 301 and MSE 395/ENGR 395/

ME 622: Turbulence

3.00 Credits

This course presents the fundamentals of turbulence. Topics include: introduction and motivation, statistical techniques for analysis, mean flow dynamics (Reynolds decomposition), Kolmogorov's theory, instrumentation, classical turbulent flowshear layers, jets, wakes, boundary layers (pipe flow) and introduction to numerical simulation of turbulent flows. Prerequisite: ENGR 331 or equivalent.

ME 640: Advanced Thermodynamics

3.00 Credits

Advanced topics in thermodynamics: energy and exergy analysis of open systems; entropy, irreversibility, and availability; equations of state and general thermodynamic relations; gas mixtures and liquid solutions; phase equilibrium and stability; external-field effects; low temperature thermodynamics; introduction to irreversible thermodynamics; and direct energy conversion. Prerequisites: ME 530 or Graduate Student Status.

ME 642: Advanced Heat Transfer

3.00 Credits

Specialized topics in heat transfer. The topics will be selected based on the interest of the students. Prerequisite: ME 548.

ME 645: Advanced Fluid Dynamics

3.00 Credits

Specialized topics in fluid mechanics. The topics will be selected based on the interest of the students. Prerequisite: ME 549.

ME 647: Multiphase Flows

3.00 Credits

Fundamental laws, physical interactions and dimensionless parameters, governing momentum transfer equations, solution techniques, and industrial, applications of multiphase flow processes, including gas-solid, gas liquid, and liquid-solid systems. Emphasis is primarily placed on particle-fluid interactions. Prerequisite: ME 549.

ME 648: Heat Exchangers-Theory and Applications

3.00 Credits

Transport properties and dimensionless parameters; heat exchanger classification, heat exchanger design; UA-LMTD and ,-NTU methods; fouling; header design; flow regimes in two-phase heat transfer; pressure drop and heat transfer correlations for boiling and condensation. Applications include double pipe heat exchangers, shell and tube heat exchangers, compact heat exchangers, evaporators, and condensers. Prerequisites: ME 548 or Graduate Student Status.

ME 651: Advanced Topics of Infrared Systems

3.00 Credits

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive review of Surveillance and Reconnaissance (S&R) imaging system modeling and performance prediction. The goal of S&R systems is to provide information-detection, classification and identification of objects and features based on image characteristics. Given a set of information requirements, the system designer and operator must design and operate a system in a manner that will provide the required information. They thus require the ability to model and predict the performance of S&R systems based on design attributes and measurable operating parameters. Performance is defined in terms of the ability of users to extract the desired information. System descriptions, S&R modeling history, system characteristics, and performance models are all provided. While there are many texts describing imaging systems in the realm of linear shift invariant systems, target acquisition, driving and flying, there are few texts that address the specific design and analysis techniques used with S&R imaging systems. In particular, the emphasis here is on validated prediction of human observer performance. Prerequisite: graduate student status.

ME 654: Computational Structural Mechanics

3.00 Credits

Introduction to Finite Elements. Finite Element model construction applying direct and variational principles. Condensation techniques. Isoparametric elements. Introduction to dynamic models. Coupled problems: structural-electromagnetic systems and fluid-structure interactions. Numerical integration methods. Prerequisite: ME 503.

ME 656: Optimal Control

3.00 Credits

Linear quadratic Gaussian optimal control; linear quadratic regulator; introduction to robust control; gain margin, phase margin; H-2, H-infinity controller. Prerequisites: ME 510 or Graduate Student Status.

ME 657: Advanced Dynamics

3.00 Credits

A more in-depth study of material covered in ME 557. Multiple methods for obtaining equations of motion for rigid multibody systems, based on Kane's method. Topics to be covered will include the differentiation of vectors, kinematics, mass distribution, energy functions, and formulation of the equations of motion. Prerequisites: Graduate Student Status.

ME 660: Intermediate Acoustics

3.00 Credits

The course will cover issues related to linear acoustics that stem from an understanding of the acoustic wave equation. The topics include acoustic metrology, attenuation of sound, radiation and reception, wave-guides human hearing and transduction. These analytic concepts will be applied to applied topics including musical instruments, audio, and biomedical ultrasound. Prerequisite: Graduate student status.

ME 663: Transduction in Acoustics/Vibration

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 664: Modal Analysis

3.00 Credits

Theoretical modal analysis. Random vibrations. Estimation of natural frequencies and mode shapes from experimental data. Experimental techniques for vibration measurements. Vibration sensors. Signal processing and data handling. Prerequisite: ME 666.

ME 666: Advanced Vibrations and Structural Dynamics II

3.00 Credits

Vibration of single degree of freedom systems. Multi-degrees of freedom systems. Introduction to modal analysis: natural frequencies and mode shapes. Distributed parameter systems: vibration of beams and plates. Analytical dynamics: LaGrange equations and Hamilton's principle. Prerequisites: ME 344 or Graduate Student Status.

ME 668: Active and Passive Vibration Control

3.00 Credits

Passive surface damping treatments: visco-elastic materials and sandwich structures. Active damping treatments. Application of optimal control techniques to vibration reduction. Adaptive control techniques. Magnetic damping treatments. Prerequisites: ME 507, ME 666.

ME 669: Nonlinear Vibration

3.00 Credits

This course includes derivation of nonlinear equations of motion for large amplitude mechanical vibrations (such as of beams and plates) but focuses on the analysis of the dynamics of nonlinear oscillators (such as Duffing, Van der Pol, and Mathieu/Hill equations). Topics considered include phase-plane analysis and stability, asymptotic and perturbation methods such as Lindstedt-Poincaré, multiple scales, and Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky, the harmonic balance method, external excitation, primary and secondary resonances; parametric excitation, Floquet theory, and multi-degree of freedom systems including nonlinear normal modes and center manifold theory.

ME 701: Finite Element Method: Theory and Applications

3.00 Credits

The course describes the fundamentals of finite element theory. Finite Element formulations for various physical systems are derived through variational forms of energy functionals. Finite elements for elastic structures, porous materials, piezo-electric materials, fluid and thermal systems are analyzed with emphasis on interaction phenomena and coupled behaviors.

ME 702: Advanced Prob. Computational Vibrations & Acoustics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ME 703: Advanced Problems in Vibration and Acoustics

3.00 Credits

Topics include longitudinal and transverse waves in solids: bars, plates, and cylindrical shells; dispersion and impedance. Sound radiated by vibrating structures, effect of fluid loading on structural vibrations, sound-induced vibrations and fluid/structure interactions.

ME 721: Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics

3.00 Credits

Numerical solution of inviscid flow equations, Navier-Stokes equations, boundary layer equations, and turbulent flows. Emphasis on grid generation. . Practice problems with commercial codes. Prerequisite: ME 521.

ME 726: Advanced Combustion and Multiphase Systems

3.00 Credits

Based on the interest of the students, this course discusses in detail a few selected, advanced topics in one of the following subareas: gas-sold suspensions, fluidization, gas-liquid systems, slurry flows, coal combustion, ICEs, boilers and fuels, incineration systems, and multiphase mechanics. Emphasis is placed on training students in independent study and in grasping the forefront of the particular research field. Final project by students. Prerequisites: ME 539, 544.

ME 728: Advanced Problems in Pollution Control

3.00 Credits

Based on the interest of the students, this course discusses in detail a few selected, advanced topics in one of the following application areas: air pollutants emission control, indoor air quality control, wastewater treatment, water quality control, soil contamination and remediation, incineration of chemical waste, and microbiological treatment of waste. Emphasis is placed on training students in independent study and in grasping the forefront of the particular research field. Final project by students. Prerequisite: ME 537.

ME 733: Turbulent Flows

3.00 Credits

Nature of turbulence and the formulation of governing equations. Application to free shear and wall flows, statistical description of turbulence, spectral dynamics, turbulence modeling, experimental methods. Final project by students. Prerequisite: ME 645.

ME 741: Advanced Problems in Thermal Science

3.00 Credits

Based on the interest of the students, this course discusses in detail a few selected, advanced topics in one of the following subareas: applied thermodynamics, advanced thermodynamics, heat conduction, convective heat/mass transfer, thermal radiation, heat/mass exchangers, and heat transfer enhancement. Emphasis is placed on training of students in independent study and in grasping the forefront of the particular research field. Final project by students. Prerequisite: ME 548.

ME 752: Advanced Topics in Mechanics

3.00 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the phenomena of nonlinear oscillations. Emphasis is placed on identifying the phenomena from a physical perspective, understanding their behavior, and obtaining approximate closed-form solutions that define the essential characteristics of their behavior. Results are compared to those obtained from similar linear systems. Examples are limited to single-degree-of-freedom systems, in order to enable sufficiently rigorous study of some of the most common phenomena. This course serves as an introduction to more advanced study in the nonlinear oscillations of multi-degree-of-freedom and continuous systems, nonlinear control, and chaos theory. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

ME 754: Advanced Computational Structural Analysis

3.00 Credits

Vibration of discrete systems, the eigenvalue problem, discrete systems, continuous systems, discretization of continuous systems, the finite element method, condensation methods and sub-structure synthesis. Final project by students. Prerequisite: ME 654. Prerequisite: ME 504.

ME 756: Advanced Problems in Controls

3.00 Credits

Topics include optimal control of continuous and discrete systems, linear quadratic regulator and tracking, Riccati equations and eigenstructure of Hamiltonian, and robust control techniques for linear systems (H4 and H2). Adaptive control techniques with emphasis on real-time parameter estimation, mode reference adaptive and self-tuned systems. Nonlinear control analysis and design using feedback linearization and variable structure control. Final project by students. Prerequisite: ME 512.

ME 760: Advanced Topics in Acoustics

3.00 Credits

Research oriented course focused on sound environments. This course covers ocean and atmospheric acoustics as well as architectural acoustics. This course also includes topics related to nonlinear phenomenon such as shock wave propagation and parametric arrays. Prerequisite: ME 560

ME 761: Acoustic Imaging

3.00 Credits

no description available