The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Engineering, General (ENGR)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

ENGR 99: Engineering New Frontiers

0 Credits

no description available

ENGR 102: Introduction to Engineering Design and Professionalism

3.00 Credits

Lectures focus on the design process and professionalism. Implementation of the design process through interdisciplinary design projects with emphasis on teamwork, scheduling, analysis, decision making, and oral and written communication skills.

ENGR 104: Introduction to Engineering Laboratory

1.00 Credits

In this class, students will apply mathematics and science principles to engineering problems. Students will work in groups to 1) conduct experiments, 2) collect, analyze, and interpret experimental data, and 3) develop written technical reports and orally present results from the experiments.

ENGR 106: Computer Aided Engineering Tools

3.00 Credits

Introduction to Graphical Communications Tools. Two-dimensional engineering drawings using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software; three-view drawings; auxiliary views; isometric and oblique projections; sections. Introduction to 3-D and advanced modeling using CAD Tools.

ENGR 201: Engineering Mechanics I

3.00 Credits

Topics covered include: Vector algebra, force vectors; concurrent force systems and equilibrium of particles; moment systems and equilibrium of rigid bodies. Structural applications and machines; internal forces; friction; moments of inertia. Math 122 and Phys 215 are co-requisites.

ENGR 202: Engineering Mechanics II

3.00 Credits

Kinematics and kinetics of particles and of rigid bodies in plane motion; equations of motion in various coordinate systems; integral forms, work and energy, impulse and momentum; computer simulation software.

ENGR 207: Programming Robots and Sensors

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 211: Thermodynamics

3.00 Credits

An introductory course in thermodynamics, intended to introduce sophomores to the fundamentals of thermal processes. It is one of three courses composing the fundamentals of the thermo-fluid sciences curriculum, the other two being fluid mechanics and heat transfer.

ENGR 212: Electric Networks

3.00 Credits

The basic theory of electric circuits including the basic laws and techniques used in the analysis of electric circuits, transient and steady state response, and steady state sinusoidal analysis are studied. Pre-requisite: PHYS 216 Co-requisite: MATH 222

ENGR 222: Engineering Mathematics I

4.00 Credits

Differential equations is the language of engineers and is an important tool for formulating mathematical models of physical problems encountered in everyday engineering practice. In this class, you will be taught various tools for formulating, solving, analyzing, and interpreting mathematical models of physical problems. Analysis of 1st & 2nd order differential equations using analytical, numerical, and graphical techniques will be taught. Lectures will be complemented by weekly computer laboratory sessions teaching and using Matlab for solving real-world problems in engineering.

ENGR 301: Mechanics of Solids

3.00 Credits

An introductory course in the mechanics of deformable bodies. Analysis of simple structural members to resist safely axial, torsional, and bending stresses caused by static loads on structural systems.

ENGR 314: Introduction to Alternative Energy

3.00 Credits

This course will deal with the issues of alternative energy sources and sustainable energy sources. We will pay particular attention to the efficiency of each alternative energy source as well as what limitations exist in terms of extracting useable energy. The course will start out covering solar energy but will then move to other alternative energy sources such as Wind, Tides, Hydroelectric, Ocean Currents, and Geothermal. This course is not intended to be overly technical, in the sense that non-engineering majors should be able to understand the material.

ENGR 321: Electronic Circuits I

3.00 Credits

The course presents the fundamentals of electronic circuits. The course includes the study of semiconductor materials, junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers.

ENGR 331: Fluid Mechanics

3.00 Credits

This course covers the basic concepts, laws, processes, and problem-solving techniques of fluid flows. It discusses fluid properties, statics, kinematics, dynamics, conservation of mass & momentum, Bernoulli's equation, potential (inviscid) flows, viscous flows, boundary layers theory, dimensional analysis, and engineering applications of internal and external flows.

ENGR 355: Electrical Laboratory I

1.00 Credits

A correlated sequence of laboratory experiments to illustrate the fundamentals of electronic principles and components as a basis for engineering system design. Emphasis on analog filters, semiconductor devices, operational amplifiers, digital circuits, and transducers, followed by diodes, bipolar junction and field effect transistor applications.

ENGR 395: Engineering Materials Laboratory

1.00 Credits

Experimental determination of mechanical properties of materials including steel, wood, plastics, and concrete. Determination of Young's Modulus, Poisson's ratio, ductility, yield strength, ultimate strength, toughness, and hardness for steel, aluminum and brass. Strength determination of wood specimens. Creep behavior of plastics; Strain gauge installation and use; Concrete mixing design; and the strength properties of concrete specimens. Report writing and application of basic statistical principles on experimental results.

ENGR 401: Senior Seminar I

1.00 Credits

Current topics related to the engineering profession, and preparation for and taking of the Fundamentals in Engineering (FE) Examination.

ENGR 403: Control Systems

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 408: Batteries, Fuel Cells, and Energy Storage

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 438: Introduction to Enviromental Engineering

3.00 Credits

A first course for students interested in environmental engineering. The course discusses air pollution, indoor air quality, and global climate change; emission and control of air pollutants; water supply, quality, and pollution; treatment of drinking water and wastewater; and characterization and management of solid/hazardous waste. The problem-solving techniques based on mass balance, chemical kinetics, environmental microbiology, and energy conversion calculations are rigorously taught for quantitative analysis of environmental problems and their engineering solutions. Open-ended problems will be assigned and a tour to a local environmental engineering facility will be arranged.

ENGR 441: Interdisciplinary Senior Design I

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 443: Mobile Computing

3.00 Credits

Mobile Computing refers to the intersection of hardware, software, and communication technologies that enable the transmission of data, voice, and video via a wireless-enabled device that is expected to be transported during normal usage, not tethered to a fixed physical link. This course explores various challenges and opportunities of mobile computing, including topics such as wireless network protocols and standards (3G/4G, WiFi, Bluetooth), location awareness (GPS), sensing (video, audio, motion), user interfaces (touch, high-res display), application development, and security/privacy concerns. This course will give the student significant hands-on experience in programming mobile devices using iOS and Android smartphones, tablets, and smart watches as development platforms (Note: students supply their own devices). Students will have the opportunity to explore various features of mobile devices such as geotracking, sensing, social networking, and multimedia as part of a semester-long development project. Students can propose their own project ideas or select one of several topics provided by the instructor. Appropriate projects for this course include smartphone/tablet solutions for various applications (healthcare, security, entertainment, education, multimedia, etc.), wearable solutions (smart watches), embedded computing systems (sensor networks, in-vehicle computing, robotics), and many other topics.

ENGR 494: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 494A: Independent Study

1.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 495: Internship/Co-Op Program

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 495A: Internship/Co-Op

1.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 497: Brazilian Summer Program

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 501: Introduction to Mechatronics

3.00 Credits

Fundamental concepts for the synergistic combination of mechanical and electrical engineering, computer science, and information technology. This includes basic control systems as well as numerical methods used to design products with built-in intelligence. The fundamental aspects of mechatronics include: system modeling, simulation, sensors, actuation, real-time computer interfacing, and control.

ENGR 503: Control Systems

3.00 Credits

This course will cover concepts related to classical system analysis and control theory, beginning with system modeling and analysis, and concluding with control design. Since most engineering disciplines take this class, we will cover electrical, mechanical, and biomedical systems.

ENGR 504: Modern Control Systems

3.00 Credits

Analysis of control systems in state space, control system design via pole placement, design of state estimators, quadratic optimal control systems design. MATLAB used extensively for analysis and design problems.

ENGR 506: Basic System Design of Space Payloads

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 507: Testing & Data Analysis of Space Payloads

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 510: Strategic Standardization

3.00 Credits

A survey course, intended for graduate engineering and law students. Provides students with a broad understanding of the interdisciplinary issues associated with standardization, which is a difficult concept to define. From a broad perspective, the term covers every product, material, and service in commerce, anywhere in the world; it is one of the most critical components associated with the development of the global economy and all of its individual parts.

ENGR 516: Computational Methods for Graduate Students

3.00 Credits

Discretization methods (finite differences, finite volumes, finite elements), stability and convergence; parabolic, hyperbolic, and elliptic PDEs: model equations and numerical solutions method. Numerous programming exercises will be assigned.

ENGR 518: Experimental Techniques for Graduate Students

3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to the different aspects of experimental research in engineering. The course will cover fundamental issues such as: planning and design of an experimental campaign, laboratory safety, data acquisition and signal processing. State-of-the-art experimental techniques in different areas of engineering research will also be presented, with focus on modern, non-intrusive, laser-based measurement methods. The goal is provide students with the knowledge required to plan, design and conduct an experimental campaign, which they can eventually apply to their own research efforts.

ENGR 520: Mathematical Analysis for Graduate Students

3.00 Credits

This course covers the needed analytical skills in applied mathematics for graduate studies. It discusses both theorems and applied examples of six topics: ODEs, Laplace & Fourier Transforms, PDEs, Vector Calculus and Coordinates, Matrix Theory, and Complex Analysis.

ENGR 522: Mechanical Properties of Materials

3.00 Credits

This course will teach students about the response of materials to loading. Mathematical foundations: linear transformations, vectors and tensors will be covered. Fundamentals of linear elasticity: stress, strain, Hook's law, solution of static problems, antiplane and plane strain elasticity will be taught. Wave propagation through elastic media, criteria for plastic yielding will be explained. Fundamentals of dislocation theory and fracture, forces on dislocations, dislocation interactions, Griffith criterion, ductile fracture, etc. will be discussed.

ENGR 526: Electrical Properties of Materials

3.00 Credits

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties will be discussed. Also included will be case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, and others. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and will be taught the concepts of tunneling, superconductivity, giant-magneto resistivity with the help of such concepts.

ENGR 529: Computational Fluid Mechanics

3.00 Credits

Course provides an in-depth introduction to the methods and analysis techniques used in computational solutions of fluid mechanics and heat transfer problems. Contemporary methods for incompressible viscous flows are studied and some basics of turbulent flow will also be presented. CFD methods for internal and external flows will be discussed. Finite differences and finite volume techniques are emphasized.

ENGR 535: Introduction to Climate Change & Energy

3.00 Credits

This course presents an overview of energy production and usage, environmental problems caused by energy systems, global warming and atmospheric changes, climate changes and adverse impacts, and policies and possible engineering solutions. In addition to terminology, basic concepts, phenomenon of processes, and methodologies for climate change and energy, problem-solving techniques based on material, kinetics, and energy balance are also taught for quantitative analysis.

ENGR 536: Environmental Protection & Energy

3.00 Credits

This course presents an overview of modern energy production, conversion, and usage, and their various environmental impacts. Scientific and engineering solutions to air pollution, ozone depletion, acid precipitation, global warming and climate change, and solid, liquid, and hazardous waste generated from stationary and mobile energy systems will be discussed. Problem-solving techniques based on mass/energy balance, and chemical reactions are taught for quantitative analysis and design.

ENGR 538: Introduction to Environmental Engineering

3.00 Credits

A first course for students interested in environmental engineering. The course discusses air pollution, indoor air quality, and global climate change; emission and control of air pollutants; water supply, quality, and pollution; treatment of drinking water and wastewater; and characterization and management of solid/hazardous waste. The problem-solving techniques based on mass balance, chemical kinetics, environmental microbiology, and energy conversion calculations are rigorously taught for quantitative analysis of environmental problems and their engineering solutions. Open-ended problems will be assigned and a tour to a local environmental engineering facility will be arranged.

ENGR 540: Reliability Engineering

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 541: Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems: Engineering Applications

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 543: Mobile Computing

3.00 Credits

Mobile Computing refers to the intersection of hardware, software, and communication technologies that enable the transmission of data, voice, and video via a wireless-enabled device that is expected to be transported during normal usage, not tethered to a fixed physical link. This course explores various challenges and opportunities of mobile computing, including topics such as wireless network protocols and standards (3G/4G, WiFi, Bluetooth), location awareness (GPS), sensing (video, audio, motion), user interfaces (touch, high-res display), application development, and security/privacy concerns. This course will give the student significant hands-on experience in programming mobile devices using iOS and Android smartphones, tablets, and smart watches as development platforms (Note: students supply their own devices). Students will have the opportunity to explore various features of mobile devices such as geotracking, sensing, social networking, and multimedia as part of a semester-long development project. Students can propose their own project ideas or select one of several topics provided by the instructor. Appropriate projects for this course include smartphone/tablet solutions for various applications (healthcare, security, entertainment, education, multimedia, etc.), wearable solutions (smart watches), embedded computing systems (sensor networks, in-vehicle computing, robotics), and many other topics.

ENGR 545: High-Resolution Radar Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 547: Intermediate Thermodynamics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 552: Introduction to Imaging Technologies

3.00 Credits

Introduction to common imaging modalities such as ultrasound, x-rays, computer-aided tomography (CAT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Advanced computer methods of 2-D and 3-D image reconstruction as well as digital signal processing methods used in image recognition and enhancement of medical images will be covered. Physical principles of imaging, images reconstruction techniques, and advanced digital processing techniques will be discussed.

ENGR 561: Medical Ultrasound

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 562: Corrosion Engineering

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 563: Surface Engineering

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 565: Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

3.00 Credits

An introduction to nonlinear differential equations and chaos, with emphasis on applications from various fields of engineering and science. Topics include stability analysis and bifurcations, phase plane analysis, limit cycles, Poincare maps, chaos, iterated maps, fractals, and strange attractors.

ENGR 570: Basics of High Performance Computing for Engineers

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the concepts and capabilities of high performance computing using modern GPUs (graphics processing unit). GPUs are not only used for traditional graphics applications, many engineering computations can be performed faster on the GPU than on a traditional CPU. The concept of general-purpose GPUs will also be introduced. Emphasis will be given on how to program GPUs to solve complex engineering problems efficiently. Topics Included: History of GPUs, Modern GPUs : A Hardware Perspective, CUDA Programming Model, CUDA Threads, CUDA Memories, GPU Performance, Advanced Techniques, Heterogeneous Systems, Multi-GPU systems. Pre-requisite: Basic understanding of C/C+ is desired but experience in any programming language (or MATLAB) will suffice.

ENGR 575: Introduction to Systems Analysis

3.00 Credits

Introduces a scientific approach to decision making, usually under conditions requiring the allocation of scarce resources. Provides several of the most useful and realistic mathematical models available for solving engineering management problems, including linear programming, transportation and assignment models, deterministic economic order quantity inventory models, and network models. Same as CMGT 575.

ENGR 583: Mech. Design & Optimization of Electronic Syst.

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 584: Introduction to Nanotechnology

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 585: Optimization Methods for Engineering Systems

3.00 Credits

This is a survey course of advanced numerical and computational optimization methods as applied to equations governing engineering systems. It will employ the MATLAB numerical package and review engineering modeling techniques: first principles, empirical data and numerical solution techniques for ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations. The course will then cover fundamental principles of optimization techniques as applied to modeled engineering systems. This is an applied course that will consist of assigned problems requiring computer-based solutions to optimize engineering systems.

ENGR 595: Graduate Student Internship/Co-Op Program

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 595A: Graduate Student Internship/Co-Op Program

1.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 621: Kalman Filtering

3.00 Credits

This course covers basic problem of state estimation (prediction, Kalman filtering, smoothing), the steady-state Kalman filtering for linearized state variable model, and state estimation for the "not-so-basic" state estimation. The state estimation is also discussed for nonlinear model. The course is accompanied with computer projects. Prerequisites: Random Signal Theory, EE 561 or equivalent.

ENGR 623: Numerical and Analytical Methods in Partial Differential Equations and Inverse Problems

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 626: Wave Propagation Analysis

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 627: Mutiphysics Finite Element Analysis

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 634: Digital Image Processing

3.00 Credits

This course deals with the fundamentals of the major topics of digital image processing. The topics used in the course include the two-dimensional systems and mathematical preliminaries, image sampling and quantization, image transforms, stochastic models, image enhancement, filtering, restoration, reconstruction, and compression. This course is accompanied with computer projects. Prerequisites: Random Signal Theory, EE 561 or equivalent.

ENGR 652: Advanced Optical & Imaging Processing

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 696: Master's Thesis Research

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 696B: Master's Thesis Continuation

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

ENGR 724: Multiphysics Finite Element Analysis

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 797: Special Topics

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 798: Special Topics II

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 993A: Directed Research - Doctoral

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

ENGR 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

ENGR 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.